Rottingdean windmill vandalised – Investigation Launched

Police are investigating how thugs vandalised a historic Sussex windmill.

The windmill in Rottingdean was targeted over the weekend and local residents have since contacted Brighton and Hove City Council and asked it to clean it.

Geoff Rawlings, of Beacon Hill, Ovingdean, yesterday said: “I was walking my dog this morning when I saw it.

“The whole area is devastated. I just couldn’t believe that anyone could do that to the Rottingdean Windmill.

“It’s part of the backdrop of the Sussex Coast and someone has done this to it.

“It’s about 3ft big. It’s not discreet – it’s really in your face.

“It’s our national monument and has been there for hundreds of years and then someone goes and defaces it – it’s horrible.”

Sergeant Neil Durkan, of Sussex Police, said: “We have become aware of the graffiti and are investigating. We would urge anyone with information to contact police on 101 or the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 08000 555 111.”

Source: The Argus

Sussex windmills Jack and Jill ‘could dance together’

25 June 2013 Last updated at 21:37 BST

Two landmark mills on the Sussex Downs, affectionately known as Jack and Jill, could be seen “dancing in the wind together” for the first time in living memory.

Post mill Jill is in working order after years of preservation by enthusiasts, while the new owner of tower mill Jack plans to replace its cap and sweeps to bring it back to working order for the first time since 1906.

Robin Gibson spoke to Jack’s owner Jolyon Maugham, and Jill trustee Paul Barber.

Source: BBC – Watch a Video

Six Youths Arrested Over Fire That Destroyed Historic Windmill In Holland

Six teenage boys have been arrested after an historic windmill in Friesland, Holland was burned to the ground over the Easter weekend.

The Windlust mill in the village of Burum dates back to 1787 and played a key role in hiding fugitives from the Germans during the Second World War.

It was reduced to cinders in a fire on Sunday night which police believe was started by local youths letting off fireworks.

Four boys from Burum, in the north-eastern corner of the province, and the nearby town of Dokkum, aged between 12 and 14, were arrested in the days after the fire and have since been released.

On Wednesday police announced that two boys aged 14 and 15 from Kollum, between Burum and Dokkum, had been detained.

During the Second World War eight refugees were hidden in the cellar of the village church, which overlooked the windmill. The miller used the formation of the sails to let the fugitives know when it was safe to come out.

In 1997 it was sold to the district council in Kolummerrand to be restored.

The full story is reported here:

http://www.amsterdamherald.com/index.php/allnews-list/207-20120411-windmillfire

Outwood Smock Mill – Latest Historical Picture

Recently while trawling through the archives over at the Mills Archive Trust we came across this amazing photograph!

This is a picture of Outwood Smock Mill probably some time in the 1940’s to the 1950’s.

Outwood Mill Smock Mill Delapidated Story

Photo courtesy of Mills Archive Trust

We know that Smock Mill at Outwood blew down in a gale in November 1960 – you can find out more about the Outwood Smock Mill by clicking here

Records show that Outwood Smock Mill was the tallest smock ever built and it was constructed around 1792 by Ezekiel Budgen, who was the Uncle of the then Miller of the Post Mill at Outwood one William Budgen. William was the Grandson of the Builder of Outwood Mill, Thomas Budgen.

As you can see from the picture the smock mill was in a bad way and after it blew down much of the timber was “rescued” by the locals and there are some sheds and summerhouses in the village that contain wood from the Smock Mill. In fact the garage on the current Outwood Post Mill site and the Stable Barn attached to the property next door are also constructed from timbers from the old Smock Mill.

Its a sad loss and of course if it were standing today it wouldn’t have been left to blow down in a gale.

If you have any pictures or stories about Outwood Post Mill or the Smock Mill at Outwood, then we would be delighted to hear from you.

The Decline of Britain’s Windmills

outwood windmill outwwod common surrey post mill news decline of windmills

The windmill’s unmistakable silhouette makes it one of the most distinctive features of Britain’s landscape.

From the basic mill to the complex, from the tiny to the tall, windmills were rendered obsolete by the advent of new technologies, firstly steam then electricity. However, some mills remain as beacons of our heritage. Located on the Fylde coast, or “Windmill Land” as it has been called, Marsh Mill has been saved and restored through a mixture of fortuity and community action.

Windmill Land

Situated in the northwest of England, Fylde is the area of land between the Trough of Bowland, the Ribble Valley and the Irish Sea. At one point there were over 35 windmills on the Fylde coast.

This predominance of windmills earned the area its name, Windmill Land. Charles Allen Clarke coined the phrase. Born in 1863, he was sent to work in a local factory mill at the age of 13. After being emancipated, he later turned his talents to journalism. Clarke was to become the editor of the Blackpool Echo.

Windmills throughout history

Evidence of windmills in England dates from the 12th Century, though there are earlier references in the Domesday Book to animal or water-powered mills. Windmills were popular in areas such as Fylde for two reasons. Firstly, their function, grinding corn, was a necessity in an arable area such as this. Secondly, wind power is plentiful on the breezy Fylde coast, making the choice of wind over water mills an obvious one.

In their heyday during the 1840s, there were several thousand mills operating in Britain. Nowadays, few windmills remain and even fewer are functional, making Marsh Mill something of a national treasure. Marsh Mill is a fine example of a tower mill, the third generation of mills.

credit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/legacies/heritage/england/lancashire/article_1.shtml

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