Outwood Mill Mystery Man (Perhaps an Outwood Miller).

One of the regular visitors to Outwood Mill is Yasmin Khan and her grandson Tiernan (who we’re always happy to see) recently presented us with a bit of a mystery!

In discussions with Yasmin it came to light that there was a Gentleman who used to be around Outwood Mill around 2009 who, from Yasmin’s recollection said that he was either the Miller or that he helped at the Mill.

Yasmin kindly sent this photo of the man (above) and now we need to find out who he is.

CAN YOU HELP IDENTIFY THE MAN IN THE PICTURE

We’d love to know who he was and what, if any part he has played in the history of Outwood Mill. Maybe you know him, maybe he’s still around (God willing) and perhaps would like to come to the Mill again.

Please email the mill at info@outwoodmill.com and we publish the results once we have pinned down who our Mystery Man is.

Outwood Mill Twitter Following Reaches the 1000 Mark!

outwood mill news twitter following reaches over 1000

Outwood Mill is becoming “Big” in the Social Networking arena!

After a dedicated marketing campaign by “webdesignhaus.co.uk” (Our internet design & Marketing partner) the dedicated twitter following for Outwood Mill has now exceeded over 1,000 people and/or organisations.

The nett result of this has been a definite increase in visitor numbers to Outwood Mill and more bookings for Schools, Scouts and other organisations.

Interestingly, because of the way webdesignhaus have targeted the right kind of followers for us in Twitter we have seen a large number of enquiries from National and International media publications and have been mentioned on Radio 2’s Jeremy Vine Show, The Independent Newspaper, The Times Educational Supplement and even by National Geographic who are considering doing an article on the Windmill at Outwood.

We know that as our investment into marketing begins to bear fruit the benefit to the Mill and Outwood Village will be enormous.

Watch this space as with the expertise being provided to us by WebDesignHaus it won’t be long before we are reporting that we’ve hit 5,000 dedicated followers.

Follow us on Twitter:

Outwood Mill On Twitter

Outwood Post Mill Featured On Stikinotes.com

outwood post mill features on stikinotes.com

After a recent visit to Outwood Mill by someone from Stikinotes.com. Outwood Mill is the FIRST Windmill in the UK To be featured on the Stikinotes.com site.

Stikinotes.com is a great way to share the places you have been to and also a fun way to find new places to visit based on the experiences of other people using Stikinotes.com.

Stikinotes is also available as an app for your phone so you can get information about things to do and places to visit while you are on the move and whats more you can even add places while you are visiting them! How cool is that!

Thanks again to Jessica from Stikinotes for adding us on the site.

Our stikinotes page is at – http://www.stikinotes.com/explore/669/outwood-windmill.aspx

Millwrights Inspect Outwood Mill

outwood-windmill-outwwod-common-surrey-owlsworth-ijp-restoration

Recently we had the renowned millwrights Owlsworth IJP come and inspect the mill.

Although the mill is in good order generally we had an inkling that the current set of sweeps are in need of some attention due to their age.

The current sweeps were last repaired some 10 years ago and having withstood wind and weather for that period of time has taken its toll, as expected and one of the sweep arms in particular is fairly rotten and could present a danger to visitors.

Whilst he was here, Neil from Owlsworth IJP took considerable time to look at every aspect of the mill and found some other areas that need attention such as some of the planking on the side of the mill and of course the mill stones.

Although Outwood Mill is legendary amongst the millwright community, Neil had never been in the mill (he’d driven past it a few times). He said it was a real pleasure to see inside and get a feel for our lovely old windmill.

We are now also looking for two pairs of mill stones to replace the old stones that in Outwood Mill at the moment. Whilst Neil was here we established that the Forward pair are likely to be Derby Peak Stone and the rear pair look like a pair of Burr Stones, possibly French (though he can’t be sure).

We are now waiting on Neils full report and once we have this then fundraising and grant applications will begin in earnest. Once we have the report in our hands we’ll bring you another update.

The Decline of Britain’s Windmills

outwood windmill outwwod common surrey post mill news decline of windmills

The windmill’s unmistakable silhouette makes it one of the most distinctive features of Britain’s landscape.

From the basic mill to the complex, from the tiny to the tall, windmills were rendered obsolete by the advent of new technologies, firstly steam then electricity. However, some mills remain as beacons of our heritage. Located on the Fylde coast, or “Windmill Land” as it has been called, Marsh Mill has been saved and restored through a mixture of fortuity and community action.

Windmill Land

Situated in the northwest of England, Fylde is the area of land between the Trough of Bowland, the Ribble Valley and the Irish Sea. At one point there were over 35 windmills on the Fylde coast.

This predominance of windmills earned the area its name, Windmill Land. Charles Allen Clarke coined the phrase. Born in 1863, he was sent to work in a local factory mill at the age of 13. After being emancipated, he later turned his talents to journalism. Clarke was to become the editor of the Blackpool Echo.

Windmills throughout history

Evidence of windmills in England dates from the 12th Century, though there are earlier references in the Domesday Book to animal or water-powered mills. Windmills were popular in areas such as Fylde for two reasons. Firstly, their function, grinding corn, was a necessity in an arable area such as this. Secondly, wind power is plentiful on the breezy Fylde coast, making the choice of wind over water mills an obvious one.

In their heyday during the 1840s, there were several thousand mills operating in Britain. Nowadays, few windmills remain and even fewer are functional, making Marsh Mill something of a national treasure. Marsh Mill is a fine example of a tower mill, the third generation of mills.

credit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/legacies/heritage/england/lancashire/article_1.shtml

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